Posted by Spalding Hurst

December 21, 2010

Roughly six million cubic feet of water tumble down the Niagara Falls every minute. But for a few months in 1969 the American falls were completely dry, and last year a Connecticut man found never-before-seen photos of the historic occasion.

In 1965, the local Niagara Falls Gazette revealed that there was an abundance of loose rock at the base of the Niagara Falls—it had collected primarily during two large rockslides in 1931 and 1954—and warned that if left unremoved, the debris could cause the falls to stop flowing altogether. After a few years of indecision, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was given the task of diverting the American side of the falls over to Canada, and on June 12, 1969, they completed a 27,800 ton rock dam that halted its flow for the first time in 12,000 years.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like…

Elkhorn January

Elkhorn January

After weeks of heavy rainfall, Elkhorn Creek in Frankfort, Kentucky, was an irresistible call to...

Fishing at Lynn Camp Creek

Fishing at Lynn Camp Creek

Discover the enchanting outdoors at Lynn Camp Creek, Kentucky. Despite elusive trout, high waters, and the allure of fly fishing, the magic of nature calls, inviting you to join its embrace.

Reflection From the Lakes

Reflection From the Lakes

Rediscovering the Great Outdoors: A Reflection from Land Between the Lakes As I recently camped...